Crimson Trace Notes M3GI Sponsors

(Wilsonville, OR) – Crimson Trace, the shooting sports industry’s premier brand of laser sights and tactical lighting products for firearms, announces an expanded sponsorship list for the third annual Midnight 3-Gun Invitational (M3GI). The nearly three dozen event sponsors include many of the leading groups, retailers and manufacturers in the shooting sports industry.

Among the leading sponsors of the 2014 M3GI are: Optics Planet, National Shooting Sports Foundation, FLIR, Freedom Munitions, Danner, ERGO, Leupold, Otis, H&M Blacknitride, Kimber, Blade-Tech, Double Star, MGM Targets, Gemtech, Smith & Wesson and Mossberg. The M3GI is recognized as the nation’s top night-time 3-Gun competition and requires competitors to shoot their way through nearly a dozen stages while encountering total darkness.

Other event sponsors that will be on site or have products displayed, include: Colt Competition, Warne Scope Mounts, Hornady, Ranier Arms, FNH, Remington Commercial, PWS, Nosler, I2 Technologies, Samson, RPAMS and Vertx.

This action packed 3-Gun challenge is also being backed by: Carbon Arms, Sig Sauer, Springer Precision, Sur-Tac, Tactical Tailor, X Products, Troy Industries, Truck-Vault and Safariland. This prestigious shooting competition will be underway in central Oregon beginning on August 12, 2014. Nearly 50 industry media members have signed agreements to attend, cover and report on the multi-day program.

The Crimson Trace Midnight 3-Gun Invitational event takes place under the cover of complete darkness and competitors will use pistols, rifles and shotguns as they shoot their way through a maze of challenging stages. Those firearms will be equipped with Crimson Trace laser sights and lighting products. Participants will also be racing the clock-and the rising sun- for best times and points.

For more details, visit www.m3gi.com or call Crimson Trace at 800-442-2406.
Crimson Trace’s mission is to enhance people’s ability to protect family, home and country. All Crimson Trace products are proudly Made in the USA.

ABOUT CRIMSON TRACE:
Crimson Trace-based in Wilsonville, Oregon-is the acknowledged industry leader for laser sighting systems. The company’s many innovations include: Lasergrips®, Laserguard® and Lightguard® –all with Instinctive Activation ™–plus the Defender Series™ , Rail Master® and Rail Master Pro®. These products are engineered and manufactured in the USA. To reach Crimson Trace, visit www.crimsontrace.com or call 800-442-2406.

For more information contact:
Michael D. Faw
Media Relations Manager
Crimson Trace
9780 SW Freeman Drive
Wilsonville, OR 97070
503-783-5337
800-442-2406
www.crimsontrace.com

 

FORT BENNING, Georgia- Rifle events wrapped Frida at the USA Shooting National Championships for Rifle/Pistol as titles were awarded in the Men’s Air Rifle and Women’s Three-Position Rifle events.

Not only were titles, medals and bragging rights on the line, but for Junior shooters in these events, the chance to represent the United States at the International Shooting Sports Federation (ISSF) World Championship in Granada, Spain was also up for grabs.

Garrett Spurgeon (Canton, Missouri) claimed yet another National Title today by winning the Junior Men’s Air Rifle event. Tim Sherry (Highlands Ranch. Colorado) once again claimed the silver and Brandon Muske (Burton, Texas) won bronze.

Seems Spurgeon and Sherry are often atop the Junior Men’s Rifle podiums together. The pair has been gold/silver and vice versa since earlier this year when Spurgeon won gold and Sherry won silver in Men’s Three-Position Rifle at the National Junior Olympic Shooting Championships (NJOSC). In Men’s Air Rifle at NJOSC, Sherry instead would win the gold.

At this National Championships, Spurgeon also won the Junior Men’s Three-Position Rifle title and silver in Junior Men’s Prone. Sherry took silver in Junior Men’s Three-Position Rifle and bronze in Junior Men’s Prone.

In the rifle events contested today, National Championships is Part Two of an intensive qualification process for the World Championship that began for junior competitors during the 2014 NJOSC. The junior team members were identified following a selection process that included two qualifiers and a final at the NJOSC and another two qualifiers and two finals at National Championships.

Spurgeon and Sherry had already secured their spots on the U.S. team competing in Spain with wins earlier this week, but they will now compete in all Junior Men’s Rifle events. Joining them on the Junior Men’s Air Rifle team for the World Championship is Michael Steinel (Lowell, Ohio).

In the Open division, Ryan Anderson (Great Falls, Virginia, pictured right) would claim top honors in Men’s Air Rifle, narrowly edging out defending National Champion Connor Davis (Shelbyville, Kentucky) with the points he earned in today’s Final. Dan Lowe (U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit/Olympia, Washington) would once again find himself on the Men’s Rifle podium, this time with a bronze medal. Lowe also won silver in Men’s Prone Rifle and bronze in Men’s Three-Position earlier this week.

The gold medalist for Junior Women’s Three-Position Rifle, Lauren Phillips (Seabeck, Washington) also won gold in the event at NJOSC earlier this year. Joining her on the podium were Nicole Hankey (McKinney, Texas) who won silver and Junior Women’s Air Rifle gold medalist Sonya May (Rockland, Massachusetts) who took bronze.

Phillips, May and Lorelie Stanfield (Fairbanks, Alaska) will represent the U.S. at the World Championship in Junior Women’s Three-Position Rifle.

Hankey and Steinel would also win appointments to the National Junior Team by virtue of their top-two finish at Nationals or selection to the World Championship team.

The Women’s Three-Position title in the Open division would go to Amy Sowash (Richmond, Kentucky). Winning silver was 2012 Olympian Amanda Furrer (Spokane, Washington) and winning bronze was Sarah Beard (Danville, Indiana). Beard also won gold in Women’s Prone Rifle and bronze in Women’s Air, bringing her medal total to 12 National Championship medals since 2011.

Winners in the Open division for both rifle events were determined based on a composite of scores from each day of competition plus additional points for finish in today’s Final.

With the completion of the Rifle events, the roster for the World Championship team is now complete. The following athletes are the latest additions/updates to the World Championship roster:

Women’s Prone Rifle
Sarah Beard (Danville, Indiana)
Amanda Furrer (Spokane, Washington)
Reya Kempley (Farmington, New York)

Junior Women’s Prone Rifle
Lauren Phillips (Seabeck, Washington)
Lorelie Stanfield (Fairbanks, Alaska)
Katie Bridges (Kingsland, Texas)

Women’s 300m Three-Position and Prone Rifle
Erin McNeil (USAMU/Fort Wayne, Indiana)
Reya Kempley (Farmington, New York)
Michelle Bohren (Taylor, Michigan)

Junior Men’s Three-Position Rifle
Garrett Spurgeon (Canton, Missouri)
Tim Sherry (Highlands Ranch, Colorado)
Lucas Kozeniesky (Southern Pines, North Carolina)

Men’s Three-Position Rifle
Matt Emmons (Browns Mills, New Jersey)
Michael McPhail (USAMU/Darlington, Wisconsin)
Ryan Anderson (Great Falls, Virginia)

Action also got underway in Women’s Sport Pistol and Men’s Free Pistol with another day of competition to follow and National Champions crowned tomorrow. Currently Brenda Silva (Snowflake, Arizona) is leading Women’s Sport Pistol overall, but is followed closely by three competitors tied for second place just four points behind. In Men’s Free Pistol, Jim Henderson (USAMU/Midland, Ga.) is currently leading with a commanding 14 points ahead of his closest competitor.

For complete scores from the National Championships for Rifle Pistol, please click here: http://www.usashooting.org/library/Competitions/
2014_RP_Nationals/2014_Results_USASNC.xls.

To view and download images from this event for free, please click here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usashooting/sets/72157645006912700/.

ELEYELEY is a Proud Sponsor of the USA Shooting Rifle and Pistol Teams: ELEY Limited, manufacturer of the world’s most consistently accurate rimfire ammunition, has been the Official Sponsor and Official Supplier of .22 rimfire ammunition of the USA Shooting rifle and pistol teams since 2000. For more information on ELEY and their products, please visit www.eley.co.uk.

About USA Shooting:
USA Shooting, a 501c3 non-profit corporation, was chartered by the United States Olympic Committee as the National Governing Body for the sport of shooting in April 1995. USA Shooting’s mission is to prepare American athletes to win Olympic medals, promote the shooting sports throughout the U.S. and govern the conduct of international shooting in the country. Check us out on the web at usashooting.org and on Twitter at twitter.com/USAShooting.

 

BODY CONTOURED HANDGUN

A handgun curved to correspond more closely with the contours of a person’s body, achieving a comfortable fit when the handgun is worn for any appreciable amount of time on the person’s body. The handgun housing is inclusive of a top portion, an intermediate portion, and a grip portion, which may be separately connected or integrally formed parts sharing a radius of curvature to form asymmetric left and right sides, particularly a concave side and a convex side. This asymmetry extends beyond the grip portion and includes at least a portion of the trigger guard and a portion of the magazine securing clip. [Click here to read Patent Information]

Screen-Shot-2014-06-29-at-2.18.23-PM

http://youtu.be/qKHeXC7L85s

Just reason #164 why you need a gun safe….

 

You’ve probably seen lots of videos about guns – but never one like this:

A gun safety advocacy group is using sex toys to start a conversation around gun safety and responsibility.

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An ad released Thursday titled “Playthings” shows two young boys running around, playing with large, brightly colored dildos as if they’re swords.

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“If they find it, they’ll play with it,” the narrator says, “so always lock up your guns.”

The ad’s creator is a group called Evolve, which promotes gun safety but doesn’t take a side in the gun control debate. Co-founder Rebecca Bond said, “We don’t think that safety’s a side. Safety in the gun category should be inspiring, people should be inspired to make good choices, and safety should be cool.”

While the video may promote gun safety in an extremely unconventional way, it’s lighthearted and memorable and gets the point across: Kids are going to grab anything that’s within their reach. As responsible gun owners, it’s up to us to make sure that a firearm isn’t one of those things.

Well its that time of the year again, time for the annual H&H Shooting Sports Summer Expo, the three day event that brings the shooting sports industry directly to Oklahoma City. This years Summer Expo will take place from Thursday the 17th until Saturday the 19th from 9am to 9pm. Each year over 100 factory representatives from all of the major companies come and show off their product lines directly to the public.

What I believe will be the main attraction of this years Expo will be the Smith & Wesson table where they will be showing off the M&P line of Smith & Wesson firearms, including the M&P Shield. Smith & Wesson’s M&P Shield now joins the growing crop of palm-size, slim-and-trim single-stack 9mms that have been appearing on the handgun market at a rapid rate over the past two years. It is the lightest and smallest 9mm personal-defense auto S&W has yet offered: only six inches long, 4½ inches high, less than an inch thick and weighing just 19 ounces. Based on the duty-proven full-size S&W M&P design, it will undoubtedly take a prominent place in the concealed carry world. Moreover, the new Shield is also available chambered in .40 S&W. Same size, same weight, same design. The only difference between the M&P9 Shield and the M&P40 Shield, in fact, is that the magazines for the M&P40 Shield hold one less round than the M&P9 Shield magazines. The M&P9 Shield comes with one semi-staggered flat-base seven-round magazine and one extended-base eight-round mag; the M&P40 Shield comes with one six-rounder and one seven-round magazine. The Shield, along with the rest of the M&P line will be a highlight of the Summer Expo, and will keep the Smith & Wesson booth pretty busy for sure.

The H&H Shooting Sports Summer Expo is an event that the whole family can enjoy, as there will be something to keep everybody entertained. I have it on good authority that there will be a special appearance by Ruby and Cooper, the mascots for the Oklahoma City Redhawks, on Saturday.  This Summer Expo will be so exciting, the building wont be able to contain it all, as there will be a large trailer parked out front. While visiting the manufactures tables you will be given the opportunity to take any of their display firearms out onto the range for a test fire. It is this kind of hands on test firing that attracts shooters of all experience levels to the biggest party of the summer, the H&H Summer Expo. Outside of the factory representative tables there will also be storewide sales on many items. Highly attractive discounts will be given on the already low prices on merchandise storewide.

This year’s Summer Expo will attract shooters young and old, and of all experience levels as they take a look at what is new from the industry, all gathered conveniently in one location at H&H Shooting Sports off of I-40 & Meridian.

Beretta

When you’re the oldest active firearms manufacturer in the world, you tend to have a rich, engrossing history. With that in mind, we’ve compiled a collection of facts that you might not know about Beretta. Check them out, and be sure to share your own little-known facts with us.

Few companies possess brand name recognition on par with that of Beretta’s. When you’ve officially been at your craft since 1526—488 years ago, for those of you scoring at home—people tend to know who you are. And, when you’re the oldest active firearms manufacturer in the world, you tend to have a rich, engrossing history.

But every hunter knows that the name’s been around forever (and that seeing it stamped on a shotgun is typically a very, very good thing), but there’s an awful lot more to the centuries-old Italian company. After a little detective work—and some assistance from the fine folks over at Beretta—we were able to compile a collection of facts that you might not know about the legendary firearms manufacturer.

Check out our ten facts below, and be sure to weigh in with your own in the comments.

1. Beretta Holding unifies 26 brands and companies under its umbrella, including well-known names like Benelli,Steiner OpticsUbertiSakoFranchiStoeger and Tikka.

2. The Beretta Museum includes firearms dating as far back as the 1600s, and is home to guns from the estates of John Adams and Napoleon, among other historical figures. More than 900 pieces are present in the collection.

3. Beretta runs a non-profit organization, called the Beretta Foundation, that is dedicated to researching malignant neoplasia (cancerous tumors); in particular, it deals with the collection and analysis of clinical and experimental data regarding different forms of cancer, as well as the indication of therapies for patients suffering from types of neoplasia, particularly breast or lung cancer, with special attention to prevention and immunology studies.

4. In addition to high-quality firearms, the Beretta family produces a number of renowned Italian wines. So, yes, it technically would be possible to put your Beretta shotgun to work by day and enjoy a Beretta beverage by night.

5. In the late 1940s Giuseppe Beretta partnered with Luigi Castelbarco and motorcycle designer Giuseppe Benelli to design and manufacture automobiles. Beretta was tasked with producing both the engine and the square-tube frame chassis. The prototype, known as the BBC (Beretta, Benelli, Castelbarco), was presented in 1948, with a Benelli engine. It would never enter full production, but one of the original samples is on display at the Beretta plant in Italy.

6. Beretta was originally born as a manufacturer of gun barrels. In 1526, Maestro Bartolomeo Beretta was paid to produce 185 arquebus barrels by the Arsenal of Venice. The bills of sale are said to still be in the company’s archives.

7. Luigi Gussalli, born in 1885 and grandson of Bartolomeo, didn’t work with firearms. He instead turned to astronautics, specializing in the engineering of multi-stage rockets. In 1923 he authored a book, titled “Can We Attempt a Space Journey to the Moon?” He regularly exchanged correspondence with some of the field’s most respected minds. Unfortunately, he passed away in 1950—19 years before the United States put the first man on the moon.

8. 2015 will mark the 100-year anniversary of the production of Beretta’s very first semi-automatic pistol. Though the92FS is the company’s trademark sidearm, Beretta’s semi-automatic roots rest with the Model 1915, which was adopted by Italian forces during World War I.

9. Speaking of handguns… Most folks know that the legendary fictional spy James Bond has long carried a Walther PPK, both on film and in print publications. Not many people, though, realize that 007’s very first carry gun was a Beretta 418. Author Ian Fleming depicted the super spy with the 418, chambered in .25 ACP, in the novel Casino Royale, Bond’s very first adventure. Fleming later changed his character’s signature firearm after corresponding with a particularly passionate fan.

10. Beretta was the likely manufacturer of the famed “Mayflower Gun.” The firearm is named as such because historians believe it made the trip to the New World on, as you’ve probably guessed, the Mayflower. Indeed, according to the markings on the rare Italian wheelock’s barrel and lockplate, the gun was either manufactured or repaired by the Beretta family of armorers.

Sharper-Image-Ammo-Dispenser

Before you purchase personal-protection ammunition, contemplate the following items. Only then can you make an informed decision about what load best suits your unique set of demands.

Price: Honestly answer this question: What value do you place on your life, or those of your family members? I would wager that it’s more than the $1 to $1.50 cost of a defense-specific round that could potentially preserve your—or your family’s—wellbeing. As such, ignore the price tag; instead, focus on the loads’ performance parameters and whether or not they meet your demands.

Expectations: Where do you live? From where do you anticipate a threat to emerge? What measures are you willing to take to stop a threat? The answers to these questions will narrow the field of suitable options considerably.

Do you want your ammunition to be able to defeat “light” barriers, such as clothing, or be “barrier blind,” and clean house through the much-vaunted “FBI protocol?” Bullets well suited for the former generally perform poorly against “hard” barriers; however, their advantages include: reduced risk of over-penetration, increased energy dispersion and, in the case of a miss, rapid deceleration upon striking an object. Loads fitting this description are Federal’s Guard Dog,Hornady’s Critical Defense, and Liberty Ammunition’s Civil Defense. Typically, these loads feature light-for-caliber bullets and, if a lead core is utilized, it is not bonded to the jacket.

Projectiles that are designed specifically to meet the stringent FBI protocol penetrate deep and readily defeat various types of barriers; however, they can result in over-penetration and are more difficult to stop with an outright miss. They do, however, offer consistency with regard to depth of penetration, expansion, and weight retention. Such loads include: Hornady Critical Duty, Federal HST and Hydra-Shok, Speer Gold Dot, Winchester Bonded PDX1 and Defend,Barnes TAC-XPD, Nosler Defense, Cor-Bon DPX, and Remington Ultimate Defense and Golden Saber, among others.

Construction runs the gamut in this category; some feature all-copper projectiles whereas others have gilding metal jackets bonded to lead cores. Still, some have hard, lead-alloy cores with a gilding metal jacket secured via simple, yet ingenuous, “mechanical” lock. Between these two categories is found a myriad of loads that offer some combination of the aforementioned performance parameters. These include: Hornady Custom, HPR, and Fiocchi loaded with the Hornady XTP, PMC Starfire, and Federal Personal Defense (JHPs). Lastly, unless employing them for a specific reason, avoid the use of standard, non-expanding FMJ loads for personal protection, as many of the disadvantages of FBI-“protocol”-type bullets previously described are exacerbated, and there is minimal energy dispersion and reduced tissue disruption.

Reliability: Reliability is paramount in a defensive load; the ammunition must feed, fire, extract, and eject every time in your handgun. Of course, this cannot be determined at the time of purchase, but chances are, by reading and comparing reviews of the ammunition from various magazines, websites, and forums, as well as the talking with knowledgeable range and gun store staff, you will garner enough feedback about suitable (and unsuitable) handgun/ammunition combinations to make an informed buying decision. Also, double-check the owner’s manual to see if there are preferred (or required) ammunition types and bullet weights and profiles. Adhere to these suggestions for both safety and optimal performance. Lastly, spend time at the range confirming the compatibility of your chosen ammunition with handgun. Do not rely on an unproven combo.

Velocity: Trajectory and energy aren’t the primary concerns surrounding velocity; rather, that, in your gun, the bullet attains sufficient speed to reliably upset is the foremost consideration. Bullets are designed to work within a specific window of velocities, and deviating from that range can cause the projectile to fail to expand (i.e. acting as a FMJ), over-expand, thereby reducing penetration, and even experience jacket-core separation or unintended fragmentation. The former is most evident in compact “pocket” pistols, which, due to their abbreviated barrel lengths, lack sufficient velocity to ensure expansion—especially if the hollow-point cavity is clogged. Many major ammunition manufacturers now have options that are designed to mitigate this concern. Some examples are: Hornady Critical Defense, Remington Ultimate Defense Compact Handgun, and Speer Gold Dot Short Barrel. For full-size handguns, relaible expansion shouldn’t be an issue. And, unless you’re using a handgun with an abnormally long barrel (or pistol caliber-chambered carbine), exceeding the upper velocity limitations of a self-defense bullet would be unlikely.

Accuracy: This is purely subjective. Does your ammunition/handgun combination need to be able to shoot 1” groups at 25 yds. to stop a threat? Perhaps, I suppose. Or is 5” to 6” adequate? Maybe somewhere between is okay. What about at 7 yds. with a “pocket” pistol? Is 2” sufficient? The reality is, in the pursuit of achieving phenomenal accuracy, you might eliminate a load that otherwise ideally meets your performance parameters. Choose wisely.

Cases: Nickel-plated or brass cases? Is there a difference? Most “premium” defensive-specific loads now feature nickel-plated cases. The reported benefits are: enhanced corrosion resistance, easier viewing (magazine and press checks) in low-light conditions, and improved feeding. If you rotate defense loads at least annually, even if you carry daily in high-moisture environments (i.e. primarily the eastern half of the U.S., Midwest, and Northwest coast) or concealed (legally) in high-perspiration areas of your body, nickel-plated cases are likely unnecessary; however, improved visibility in compromised lighting is a real benefit. As for functioning, I’ve seen no discernible difference in the feeding reliability between nickel-plated and standard brass cases. But, since nickel-plated cases are pretty much standard on defense-specific loads, consider it a bonus.

By no means is this list all-inclusive; for example, one could also consider recoil (full power vs. reduced-recoil). But, hopefully this gives you some food for thought. It’s a potentially life-saving decision that shouldn’t be made haphazardly.