A Clean Gun Means a Clean & Safe Shot

CleanGun

You are only as good as your equipment—this is gun ownership 101. Not only do you need to know how to handle it safely, you must also keep it maintained and cleaned thoroughly and often. 90 percent of the time, a dirty gun is the cause of a mechanical malfunction. In many cases, it is because of improper cleaning.

Here’s Why

An unclean gun is an unsafe one—it’s as simple as that.

Powder residue and dirt build up in the barrel of the gun every time you fire off a round. So cleaning your gun after every use is important as it can affect the accuracy and reliability of your shot. Crud can build up in the breech of the chamber and the chamber itself and the longer you put off any maintenance, the more likely your gun will malfunction. It can prevent the cartridge to fully load and may cause light firing on the pin strike or even a misfire. This buildup can cause movement between two surfaces that are suppose to be stable, which could cause critical errors in your long-range shot.

Many guns are easy to clean, yet many are not, thus it is never a bad idea to bring your gun to a professional gunsmith to have it cleaned if needed. If you want to learn on your own, take a hunter education course or join a shooting range club. These clubs and classes can provide you with assistance from experts and seasoned members.

Here’s How

Areas that are crucial to keep clean are the crown, locking lugs and recesses, bolt face and the barreled action or stock contact. The crown is vital, as any buildup or dirt on the muzzle of your gun throws off your accuracy and your shot. Buildup behind your locking lugs or recesses during ignition will weaken a stable lockup, which again will affect your accuracy. The same goes for your bolt face and barrel action and stock.

Step 1: The first step in cleaning your gun is making sure it is unloaded. Open the action to be sure it’s unloaded. Thoroughly reading through your owner’s manual is a good idea, as well. Next, remove the clips or magazines and take out the bolt (if it’s a rifle), or lock open the action of your shotgun, pistol or semi-auto rifle. Once that’s done, use solvent for brushing the bolt, then clean and dry it off. Be sure to brush the extractor and ejector, too.

Step 2: Using a cleaning rod with a bronze brush soaked in a cleaning solvent, work from the breech or chamber end and brush down the barrel and out the muzzle until it is clean. Let it dry for 15 minutes to let the solvent dissolve and soften the bullet jacket material, powder fowling and lead. After 15 minutes, run the bronze brush soaked with solvent down the barrel again, repeating several times until the gunk in the barrel is loosened. Once this is complete, take a cloth patch down the bore to clean up any remaining carbon out of the muzzle.

One bit of caution, however, is to not pull the patch back out. Instead, take it off the road and put a clean one on and then pull the road back out of the chamber end. Run the brush through at least 25 times.

Step 3: The next step is running a few solvent soaked patches down the barrel and out the muzzle end. Be sure to replace with a clean patch, pull back up and replace the patch again each time. If the patches are still really black, keep cleaning. If it continues, the barrel may need to be soaked and dried again.

Step 4: Coat your barrel and bolt with a bit of rust prevention oil. With a clean, soft cotton cloth, dabbed with oil, wipe down all the metal surfaces of your gun, making sure not to over-oil it. Wearing cotton gloves can prevent any fingerprints from getting on the surfaces while oiling your gun down.

Step 5: The final step is an important one. After cleaning be sure to store your firearms in a safe place. Always use a gun case or safe to store your weapons.

Slate.com ‘s PhotoBlog recently published a photo set by photographer Charles Ommanney that examines a small selection of American Gun Owners. In contrast to whatever stereotypes and preconceived notions of who the American Gun Owner is, this photo set shines a light onto average people from every walk of life. What they found is a reflection of the Shooting Sports community. This photo set shows real people with real lives, and how their firearms play a part in their lives. 

 

Via Slate.com:

THIS IS WHAT GUN OWNERSHIP LOOKS LIKE IN AMERICA

 

By 

Miami real estate agent Loigrand De Angelis, with his son Loigrand Junior, in the parking lot of their apartment building on Feb. 9, 2013.
Miami real estate agent Loigrand De Angelis,with his son Loigrand Junior, in the parking lot of their apartment building on Feb. 9, 2013.
Charles Ommanney/Reportage by Getty Images

In early 2013, on a five-day assignment for the German magazine Stern, photographerCharles Ommanney traveled around the United States photographing Americans with their guns. Ommanney has built a career working as a political and documentary photographer and felt a responsibility to make a story that wasn’t just another “predictable NRA-bashing” type of series. He wanted to see “real” people to find out why they wanted to have guns in their homes. He also decided to shoot the project in a more engaged manner with his subjects instead of simply being a fly on the wall.

Ommanney said the project took him to six states in the Southern and Western United States, where he met people who owned guns for protection, as preparation for when things go “horribly wrong,” or simply because they like the beauty of weaponry. Instead of photographing the gun owners at a firing range or at a National Rifle Association conference, Ommanney wanted to capture them in their homes to create a sense of “normalcy.”

The British-born Ommanney was surprised by the ease at which the gun owners in America felt comfortable being photographed for this project. “I can’t imagine going around England and knocking on someone’s door and saying ‘I’d like to photograph you with your shotgun,’ ” Ommanney said. “They would look at me like I was a lunatic. But for these people, there was nothing in any shape or form abnormal about me wanting to do this; [their guns were] a perfectly normal extension of their lives.”

Clockwise from top left: Shari Baker, Ben Baker, Susan Baker, and Jesse Baker at their home on Feb. 10, 2013, in Ashburn, Ga.
Clockwise from top left: Shari Baker, Ben Baker, Susan Baker, and Jesse Baker at their home on Feb. 10, 2013, in Ashburn, Ga.
Charles Ommanney/Reportage by Getty Images

Elizabeth Lamont, who owns two handguns, at her home on Feb. 13, 2013, in South Riding, Va.
Elizabeth Lamont, who owns two handguns, at her home on Feb. 13, 2013, in South Riding, Va.
Charles Ommanney/Reportage by Getty Images

Lindsay Makowski in the living room of her home on Feb. 12, 2013, in Silver Spring, Md. Makowski now owns numerous guns after getting into a bad situation with a former boyfriend.
Lindsay Makowski in the living room of her home on Feb. 12, 2013, in Silver Spring, Md. Makowski now owns numerous guns after getting into a bad situation with a former boyfriend.
Charles Ommanney/Reportage by Getty Images

Ommanney’s favorite photos exhibit this idea of normalcy, including one of Loigrand De Angelis, who posed for Ommanney with his young son. “At first glance it’s just a dad with a baby in a Baby Bjorn on his chest, and then you take a second look and you see he’s strapped up with a 9mm just inches away from his baby—he never takes that thing off,” Ommanney said.

Another image, of teenager Elizabeth Lamont with her gun at home in Virginia, was remarkable for Ommanney because it contrasts Lamont’s innocence juxtaposed with a deadly weapon. Ommanney was struck by Lamont’s all-American looks and bedroom décor, as well as by her admitting doubt about whether she could actually fire a weapon at another person if she needed to.  “That a 17-year-old girl could even be thinking about that is so foreign to me,” Ommaney said.

From an elderly woman who kept a gun because her mother had been murdered to a family with two young girls who were well-versed at stripping down an M16 assault rifle, Ommanney’s series is a striking cross-section of gun ownership in America.

Brian and Sheila Moffatt with their children at their home on Feb. 23, 2013, in Overgaard, Ariz.
Brian and Sheila Moffatt with their children at their home on Feb. 23, 2013, in Overgaard, Ariz.
Charles Ommanney/Reportage by Getty Images

Millicent Hunter's gun at her home on Feb. 12, 2013, in Fairfax, Va.
Millicent Hunter’s gun at her home on Feb. 12, 2013, in Fairfax, Va.
Charles Ommanney/Reportage by Getty Images

Millicent Hunter at her home on Feb. 12, 2013, in Fairfax, Va. Hunter keeps the pump-action shotgun under her bed.
Millicent Hunter at her home on Feb. 12, 2013, in Fairfax, Va. Hunter keeps the pump-action shotgun under her bed.
Charles Ommanney/Reportage by Getty Images

Writer Dan Baum holds his beloved 7.63-mm Mauser C96, made in 1896, at his home on Feb. 24, 2013, in Boulder, Colo.
Writer Dan Baumholds his beloved 7.63-mm Mauser C96, made in 1896, at his home on Feb. 24, 2013, in Boulder, Colo.
Charles Ommanney/Reportage by Getty Images

Dan Wilkins at his home on Feb. 25, 2013 in Austin, Texas.
Dan Wilkins at his home on Feb. 25, 2013 in Austin, Texas.
Charles Ommanney/Reportage by Getty Images

 

David Rosenberg is the editor of Slate’s Behold blog. He has worked as a photo editor for 15 years and is a tennis junkie.

 

It Is Not Hard To Figure Out Why.

Why Female Gun Ownership is Up 77% Since 2005 - Celia Bigelow - Page 1

This is good article and a very positive trend which we would love to see continue. The trend is on fire with new female gun owners but is also a reflection of gun ownership as a whole. The reason is simple. Women want to protect themselves and their family, and guns are the great equalizer. As more and more women educate and train themselves on the safe and proper use of firearms, the evil and frightening stigma that the media has put on guns dissipates.

via TownHall.com

As the number of proposed gun-control measures increase rapidly across the country, the amount of women purchasing guns is increasing even faster.

A survey conducted by the National Shooting Sports Foundation found that 73 percent of gun dealers reported an increase in female customers in 2011, as well as the previous two years. In 2005, just 13 percent of gun owners were women. Today, that number is 23 percent–a 77 percent increase in 7 years.

While folks in the media are blaming the spike on the guns-and-glam advertising (ahem Piers Morgan), women–including myself–have a different reason: It’s self-defense, stupid.

The math isn’t surprising and the logic is simple: Women want to protect themselves and their family, and guns are the great equalizer between sexes in crimes against women. The facts are there to prove it.

Over the last ten years, as gun sales have increased, the level of crime has decreased, especially violent crime. Statistics, provided by our very own Department of Justice, show “total violent crime” in the last ten years decreased from 42.1 percent to 39.2 percent. In fact, “serious violent crime” decreased even more dramatically, down to 42.9 percent from 47.5 percent in the beginning of the decade.

Among the “serious violent crime” data is rape and sexual assault—both of which predominantly affect women. It is estimated that 1 in 5 women are a victim of sexual assault in America. But, over the last decade rape and sexual assault decreased from 26.1 percent to 24.1 percent. Robberies also decreased from 56.5 percent to 51.7 percent.

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