Great trigger control for new shooters

 

Many of shooters have wondered “why are my shots low and to the left?”  Well wonder no more.  The root cause of such a problem is caused by improper placement of the index finger on the trigger.  The correct placement of the finger would be the middle of the top section of your index finger.  Try to get it as close to the middle as you can just like this military training photo.

By pulling the trigger with nearly the end of the finger, you make the trigger go straight back.  Using more of the finger will push the whole gun off to the side, thus making your shots not as accurate as they could be.

Do this and your groups will improve.  Try this tip the next time you come into the gun range at H&H Shooting Sports. https://www.hhshootingsports.com/shop/ranges/

 

By Wireshots Team / Featured NewsFirearm News / / 0 Comments

Just like any savvy consumer would, most of us turn to the internet or private sellers when making large item purchases to save a little bit of money — and our guns are no exception. There are a number of myths that have been circulating about how easy it is to buy a gun but the fact of the matter is they just aren’t true.

“Gun Show Loophole”

Some have been led to believe that one way to purchase a gun and avoid a background check is by obtaining a firearm at a gun show. However, there is no such thing as a “gun show loophole.” The only time that a gun is sold without a background check is when a gun is sold from individual to individual. As that guns are private property, they can be bought or sold without licensing just like your car or used sofa. The reason that the gun show loophole is unable to exist is that one person cannot be “engaged in business” in private selling of guns. If it is found that one individual is buying and selling guns as a means to support their livelihood, they will be investigated by the police. A one-time large selling event, such as a gun show, allows private sellers to display a large gun collection for sale at the one-time event without raising any eyebrows.

Online Sales

While it is true that private sellers may use the internet as a means to sell their guns, there are many rules and stipulations that outline the purchasing rights. All gun purchases from online retailers have a long lists of policies, guidelines and regulations to protect both the buyer and the seller. In fact, some online forums, like Craigslist, will not even allow the posting of guns for sale on their website. Sites like eBay will only allow postings if the seller and the item are in the United States. It is legal to advertise and sell firearms within your own state but unlawful to transport or sell with knowledge that they will be transported over state lines. Although private sales are technically legal, it is illegal for a person to sell to a buyer that they believe to meet any of the criteria that would otherwise not allow them to buy a gun from a retailer that would require them to get a background check (i.e, felon, illegal alien, etc).

Online Pre-Ordering

When purchasing from a reputable online dealer, you are required to fill out your location information, complete an age and compliance verification, read and accept the online firearms ordering guidelines before being taken to the payment screen. After submitting payment online, you still are required to submit a background check at a physical store that you will be picking up the item from. In addition to these safety measures, the firearm must picked up by the purchaser with ID in hand to be fully cleared to leave the store with the firearm. In the event that the item is paid for but the purchaser is unable to provide the needed information or pass the background check, the sale is simply refunded.

Knowing the laws and regulations when purchasing firearms is important to both the buyer and seller. The best protection is to educate yourself on the matter to avoid any penalties or setbacks in your purchases.

By Wireshots Team / Featured NewsFirearm News / / 0 Comments

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Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

JUNE 11 & 12, 2016

Results Shooting, The State Games of Oklahoma

SH 01 AIR RIFLE OPEN

1

Gary M

463/600

2

Adam B

454/600

3

Charles M

413/600

4

Brian P

234/600

SH 02 AIR RIFLE WOMEN’S SH02

1

Jo E

252/400

2

Dawn P

71/400

04 AIR RIFLE INTERMEDIATE JUNIOR SH04 Men

1

Ethan C

295/400

SH 07 SMALL-BORE (.22) RIFLE OPEN

1

Gary M

495/600

2

Adam B

449/600

3

Charles T

189/600

4

Brian P

163/600

SH 09 SMALL-BORE (.22) RIFLE WOMEN’S SH09

1

Jo E

339/600

2

Dawn P

104/600

SH 11 SMALL-BORE (.22) RIFLE INTERMEDIATE JUNIOR SH11

1

Ethan C

287/600

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

JUNE 11 & 12, 2016

Results Shooting, The State Games of Oklahoma

SH 13 AIR PISTOL OPEN

1

Charles M

502/600

2

Lawrence T

477/600

3

Brian P

241/600

SH 15 AIR PISTOL WOMEN’S

1

Olga N.

251/400

2

Jo E

201/400

3

Dawn P

107/400

SH 19 .22 PISTOL OPEN

1

Donald C

282/300

2

Michael N

256/300

3

Lawrence T

253/300

4

Charles M

247/300

5

Brian P

237/300

SH 21 .22 PISTOL WOMEN’S SH21

1

Jo E

232/300

2

Dawn P

154/300

NTER FIRE PISTOL OPEN

1

Charles M

269/300

2

Michael N

229/300

3

Brian P

177/300

National Archery Day is observed annually on the second Saturday in May. In 2016 it is Saturday May 14th. Join us at H&H Shooting Sports to celebrate National Archery Day with Half Price Archery Range time all day on May 14th.

Celebrate National Archery Day by sharing your archery activities using #NationalArcheryDay on Social Media.

NationalArcheryDay_Flyer

USPSA

 

WireShots.com recently had a chance to speak to Zeke Ernst, the reloading manager at H&H Shooting Sports, about his recent trip to the USPSA Single Stack Nationals. Ernst is married with 2 kids and shoots competitively as a hobby. He placed 138 out of 407 shooters.  In this conversation with Zeke we talked about the hows and whys of what got him started in competitive shooting.

WS: First of, what is USPSA?

Zeke Ernst: USPSA is the U.S. Region of the International Practical Shooting Confederation (IPSC) introduced in 1984. It is a test of the shooters technique and skills. There are multiple divisions in USPSA. Production, Limited, Limited 10, Single Stack, Open, and Revolver. The classifications are D,C,B,A, Master, and Grandmaster. In each division there are 14 stages plus chronograph.  competitors are organized during events by both the division in which they are competing and the classification they currently hold, helping to level out the playing field.  This helps to prevent the average motorist from competing with Dale Earnhardt jr.

WS: What made you decide to shoot in competitions?

Zeke Ernst: I wanted to do it as a way to spend time with my two sons. My youngest Sean started shooting at the age of 8 and my oldest son Conner started shooting at the age of 11. We have all shot competitively in Single Stack, Production, and Limited divisions.

WS:  Who have been you biggest influences in learning to shoot pistols competitively?

Zeke Ernst:  There are a lot of great shooters out there.  The three individuals that have probably influenced me the most would be Robert Rigsby, Will Andrews and Todd Jarrett (although I haven’t ever met him, his youtube videos filled in a lot of questions I had along the way).  Robert, who is a USPSA Grand Master in Open division and Will who runs Oklahoma Pistol Skills, have both been a constant sounding board for all of the ideas I come up with and suggestions for ways to do it better.

WS: What division do you shoot in and class are you in?

Zeke Ernst: I shoot currently both Limited and in the Single Stack division and I’m in B class in both.

WS: What type of gear and firearm do you run in the competitions?

Zeke Ernst: Much to my wife’s dismay, I have a wide variety of pistol I have accumulated over the years.  Currently I run a custom Caspian 1911 that we built at H&H  for the single stack division, with Chip McCormack Magazines. In limited I have a pretty stock Glock 35 and a custom STI, both in .40S&W. I use a Bladetech belt with Safariland magazine carriers.

WS: What type of ammo are you allowed to have during the matches?

Zeke Ernst: You’re allowed to use any type of ammo, including hand loaded. I like to use hand loaded ammo because it’s cheaper to use. It’s mate the ammo to your specific shooting style and ability while still meeting the required power factor. Power Factor is another way of leveling the playing field.  The weight of your bullet time the velocity must meet certain numbers.  Minor power factor must be at 125 thousand or higher and Major has to meet the power factor of 165 thousand or higher. The courses of fire have round counts that can range from 8 rounds to 22 rounds in a match depending on how the course of fire is setup.

WS: Do you ever get nervous during a match?

Zeke Ernst: Of course, there’s a wide mixture of skilled shooters competing against each other. You meet different groups of people and ages running from 8 to 70 years of age.  You have shooters like Rob Leatham who have been doing this sort of thing for over 20 years for a living as well as first time shooters.

WS: How is scoring made during a match?

Zeke Ernst: Scoring is a combination of the value of the hits on your targets combined with the speed at which you complete the course of fire.

WS: Where is the USPSA Single Stack Nationals held and for how long?

Zeke Ernst: It’s held in Barry, Illinois at PASA Park. It’s shot over 3 days, with each days competitors shooting all 14 stages in one day.

WS: What does it take to be able to shoot at Nationals?

Zeke Ernst: You have to be a member of USPSA and submit an entry. There’s only 390 slots open, so you have to sign up early. Anyone can shoot at local club matches. H&H has an open to the public match on the first Sunday of every month. Sign up starts at 5:30 p.m. There’s also a forum on boomer shooter.com where you can find a USPSA match just about every weekend.

WS: Zeke, thank you for sitting down with us today, if our readers have any questions about getting started in USPSA, is there a way they can contact you? 

Zeke Ernst: USPSA is a nation wide sport where shooters of all skills have a chance to show off their skills and constantly improve as well as meet other shooters who enjoy the same hobby. If you have any questions you can contact Zeke who is the match director for H&H at (405) 947-3888 ext. 154.

http://www.uspsa.org/index.php

http://www.boomershooter.com/forums/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysa50-plo48

 

 

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Shooting(1)

 

The State Games of Oklahoma is truly Oklahoma’s only Amateur Sports Festival. Based on the Olympic format and officially endorsed by the United States Olympic Committee, the State Games of Oklahoma is open to every amateur athlete in our state, regardless of age, sex or ability.

The purpose of the State Games of Oklahoma is to enhance Oklahoma’s effort to unite all communities across the state through sport, health and wellness. There are currently over 11,000 Oklahomans participating in the Sooner State Games as well as the winter version of the games.

The Shooting portion of the Games will be held at H&H Shooting Sports.

DATE

May 23-24, 2015

 

LOCATION
H&H Shooting Sports
400 S Vermont Ave, #110
Oklahoma City, OK

 

ENTRY FEE
$26 first event
$7 per additional event

Deadline
Mail-in: postmarked by May 12
Online: May 19
On-site registration available

 

COMPETITIVE FORMAT

 CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

SPORT COORDINATOR
Charles Meloy
405.834.3020
Online Registration questions: The State Games of Oklahoma offices | 405.236.5000

Shooting

Hornady just released this video detailing a few of their upcoming products for next year including a .17 WSM cartridge that’s going to make a lot of shooters happy.

It’s not just new loads and new cartridges but a handful of goodies for all the reloaders out there looking for the next gotta-have-it piece of kit.

But what’s probably going to be their biggest seller is the new 9mm Critical Defense Lite, which while it’s marketed to women, is likely to sell equally well to men, too, even if some won’t admit it.

There are plenty of pocket 9mm pistols that are literally a pain to shoot and the idea behind 9mm Critical Defense Lite is to drum up a load that will still perform generally well and cycle reliably without hampering the shooter’s ability to deliver fast, accurate shots.

The 3 Main Rules of Firearm Safety and Why They’re ImportantThe safety precautions everyone must follow when using a firearm to ensure their own safety and the safety of others are simple. While there are many rules of firearm safety, three are of paramount importance and must be followed at all times.

When followed, these three rules will prevent negligent discharges. If a negligent discharge does happen, no one will get hurt. These three rules were created by the National Rifle Association.

1. Always Keep the Muzzle Pointed in a Safe Direction: Up, Down, or Away

This is the first rule of firearm safety. You are responsible for the bullet when it leaves the barrel. It basically has your name on it. The reason it is so critical is because if a firearm discharges and it is pointed in a safe direction, no harm will come to pass.

Depending on where you are, safe directions to aim the firearm include up in the air, down at the ground, and away from people or anything of value.

2. Always Keep a Firearm Unloaded Until Ready to Use

In addition to always keeping a firearm unloaded until you are ready to use it, always check the action to confirm it is unloaded when picking it up or receiving it from another person. This is true even if the firearm is brand new in the box from the manufacturer. After verifying the firearm is unloaded, the person handling it should always treat it as if it is loaded.

3. Never Put Your Finger on the Trigger Until You are Ready to Shoot

While there have certainly been documented incidents where firearm accidents occurred even though no one pulled the trigger, negligent discharges mostly occur because someone pulled the trigger by mistake.

Eliminate that possibility by never placing a finger on the trigger — meaning do not have a finger inside the trigger guard — unless planning to fire the firearm.

Other Rules to Keep in Mind

By extension of these three rules, all other errors associated with firearms are eliminated. For example, a general rule of firearms is never point a firearm at another person unless you intend to fire at them. This rule could easily replace rule number two, — and there is nothing wrong with considering it a cardinal rule — but the notion follows logically from the rule: always point a firearm in a safe direction.

Another rule of firearms is always keep the safety on, — even if a firearm is empty — but eliminating one of the three cardinal rules with this one opens the door for mistakes that the other rules prevent. As such, always keep a firearm unloaded until you are ready to use it. The safety is a mechanical device which can fail, so the person handling the firearms should always act as if the safety doesn’t work.

Key Takeaway

If a person always treats a firearm as if it is loaded, never points a firearm at another person, and keeps their finger off the trigger until they are ready to shoot, virtually all potential negligent discharges are eliminated.

A valuable resource for understanding state regulations, license fees and game species

NEWTOWN, Conn. — We’re sure you know that a day spent hunting beats a day in the office. What you might not know, though, is that a day spent hunting in many cases is more affordable than a day spent on the golf course or at a major league ballgame.

That’s something to keep in mind with National Hunting and Fishing Day

coming up on Saturday, Sept. 27. Many opportunities nationwide are available to spend a day afield that weekend.

Statistics in NSSF’s latest report, “Hunting in the 50 States: Regulations, License Fees, Species and Methods of Take,” clearly show that you get more bang for your buck hunting than in other competing hobbies and activities.

“There’s a misperception about hunting being a very expensive pastime. It can be in some circumstances, but for the most part hunting compares very favorably with the costs of other popular activities like playing golf, attending professional sports games and even going to the movies,” said Jim Curcuruto, NSSF Director of Industry Research and Analysis.

The report, found here

, estimates the average cost of a day of turkey hunting at $37.54 for license, tags and ammunition, placing it far lower than a round of golf, estimated at $72.54 for greens fees and a sleeve of balls, or a day at a major league ballpark, which will set you back $57.45 for a ticket, parking and a drink and a hotdog. While 10 days of hunting costs essentially the same as one day afield, taking in 10 movies at your neighborhood multiplex will add about $185 onto your credit card.

Of course, “Hunting in the 50 States” includes much more information than these comparisons—information that is valuable to manufacturers, retailers and shooting ranges.

To gain a better understanding of the expenses associated with hunting, NSSF combed through the regulation guides of all 50 states to produce “Hunting in the 50 States,” which consolidates data regarding big and small game, and provides both state-specific and national information.

The new report includes resident and non-resident license and tag costs, number of species available to hunt (more than 40 in some states), available hunting days and legal firearm use by state. The report’s pages contain interesting factoids on hunting—nine states, for example, allow the hunting of white-tailed deer with an air rifle—and there is an entire page on feral hog facts (population estimated at 5 million).

The report reveals how states provide many economic incentives to encourage hunting. Sportsmen and women in South Carolina, for example, enjoy two free days on which they can hunt without purchasing a state hunting license. In many states, licenses for apprentice hunters, juniors, seniors, military and the disabled are modestly priced, including for non-residents.

“Hunting in the 50 States” is available to NSSF members at nssf.org/research under the Industry Intelligence Reports tab, and non-members can contact jcurcuruto@nssf.org for additional information.